Interview on the radio – La Mecánica del Caracol

Yesterday we were been interviewed at the radio show “La Mecánica del Caracol” from Radio Euskadi.

We talked about our work, the “Inhabitants of the Microworld” series and our painting booklets.

If you want to listen to it (in Spanish), you can listen the whole program at their webpage or just the fragment in which we participate here:

We hope you find it interesting.

41. Nasty mess

The 41st chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Nasty mess”.

Larvae of the common fly (Musca domestica) are voracious feeders on any organic matter. The result of their activity is, generally, a decomposing mass, a mixture of the fluids of the decomposing matter and their own excrements. These larvae have not locomotive appendages, and they move on and inside the meal by mean of crawly movements. Their development is extraordinarily quick, and in a few days each larva will become an adult fly that will restart the cycle.

This is the 41st chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

40. Macro stars

The 40th chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Macro stars”.

There are already 40 videos from the series Inhabitants of the Microworld. To celebrate this, in this chapter we will show you some of the biggest protagonists we have been talking about. They are still small, sometimes VERY small, but they have a HUGE importance in our planet. THANK YOU FOR EXISTING! And THANK YOU FOR LETTING US EXIST!

This is the 40th chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

39. Hungry worm

The 39th chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Hungry worm”.

Naidids, also named detritus worms, conform a big group of microscopic annelids inhabiting both fresh and salty waters. Their food is composed by the particles of organic matter in the sediment. Some species, like that one appearing in the video, catch up the particles of food with their evaginable pharynx. This pharynx is evaginated through the mouth and has the shape of a strong balloon. In the video there have been inserted some small arrows indicating the location of that “tongue”. All these worms have a very important role in the recycling of the sediment, and are very common prey for other invertebrates and fish.

This is the 39th chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

38. Living comma

The 38th chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Living comma”.

Ceratopogonids, also known as “biting midges”, are close relatives to “non-biting midges” (Chironomids) and “black flies” (Simulidae). Adults of many species feed on blood and can be vectors of some diseases. Females lay eggs, with a characteristic shape of “comma”, adhered to the wet surfaces, and larvae spent all their developmental process as aquatic insects.

This is the 38th chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

Booklet Painting a freshwater pond

The new series of booklets is here. These next booklets will be about different ecosystems in which you can find microscopic organisms.

This week’s ecosystem will be the FRESHWATER POND.

The booklets still have 10 curiosities to learn from with their belonging photos and drawings to colour.

But, for this series of booklets, the artist Vanessa Linares has collaborated with us bringing her GUSPIRUS to the ecosystem with us.

Download this first booklet here to have fun with us and our new colleagues, the Guspirus.

Booklet Painting a freshwater pond
Poster Painting a freshwater pond

37. Wheel animals

The 37th chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Wheel animals”.

Rotifers are extraordinary animals. Most of them are less than 1 mm long and are characterized by two crowns of cilia whirling around the mouth. This characteristic is the reason for their common name. Although their tiny size they play a fundamental role in the aquatic ecosystems because they act as water filters from where they extract particles of organic matter and some smaller organisms.

This is the 37th chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

36. Telescopic bug

The 36th chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Telescopic bug”.

The rotifer Rotaria neptunia has some special characteristics. Its body can be enormously enlarged thanks to the telescopic structure of its foot, conformed by several segments included one into another when contracted. That ability to extraordinarily prolong its foot allows this rotifer to gain a larger area to capture bacteria that are its main food.

This is the 36th chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

35. Secret sand

The 35th chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Secret sand”.

The grains of sand forming the beach hide a lot of secrets. Among these grains live a great population of minimal living beings (crustaceans, annelids, flat worms, protozoans, etc.) keeping alive a singular ecosystem. They are, mainly, responsible for cleaning the sea water pushed by waves to the shore and filtered through the free spaces remaining among the irregular grains.

This is the 35th chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

34. Original sex

The 34th chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Original sex”.

Reproduction of ciliates has very especial characteristics. Paramecium, as representative of this group of microorganisms, allows us to observe its process of conjugation. During this process, two individuals join and interchange genetic material (DNA). This allows the process of genetic recombination that is in the basis of evolution. Possibly this is the origin of the sexual reproduction, the origin of sex.

This is the 34th chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.