44. Roundworms

The 44th chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Roundworms”.

Nematodes, also known as “roundworms” are among the most abundant animals on Earth. They live in almost all environments, both aquatic and terrestrial, and have developed a huge diversity of life strategies. A lot of them feed on vegetables, other on bacteria and animals, and even there exist some parasitic species, like the filaria and trichina. The species Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the model organisms for different specialities related with biology, among them neurobiology. Some species, one of them appearing in the video, have a surprising reproduction in which males literally nail their spermatophores in the female (in the video you can see it marked with a white arrow).

This is the 44th chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

43. Quiet hairyback

The 43rd chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Quiet hairyback”.

Gastrotichs, also called hairybacks due to their aspect, are microscopic animals living in both fresh and sea water. There are around 800 described species. They are mainly detrivores, and use to swim or slide on the sediment while looking for food. Their bodies are covered by thin setae confering the characteristic aspect. A very special singularity of these animals is that the number of cells of their bodies is constant. So, growth is not due to an increasing number of cells but to the enlargement of the original cells. This characteristic, shared with other animals as rotifers, is called eutely.

This is the 43rd chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

Coloring booklet Painting a pond among the rocks

This week’s coloring booklet is about the ponds that form among the rocks at the beaches or rocky shores.

These are salty ecosystems and they always have direct sunlight, something fundamental for the development of a rich community of organisms.

Also, we continue our safaris accompanied by the Guspirus from Vanessa Linares.

We hope you like it and you find it interesting.

Booklet Painting a pond among the rocks
Painting a pond among the rocks poster

42. Peaceful bottom

The 42nd chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Peaceful bottom”.

The bottom of the ponds and lagoons is a very special place. It is home to an enormous amount of life-forms that are dedicated, fundamentally, to take advantage of all the organic matter that arrives there. It is, therefore, the place where most of the recycling of matter and energy that is generated in the ecosystem takes place. Annelids, larvae and nymphs of many aquatic insects, water fleas, ostracods … all of them take advantage of the apparent tranquility of these areas to develop most of their vital activity.

This is the 42nd chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

Interview on the radio – La Mecánica del Caracol

Yesterday we were been interviewed at the radio show “La Mecánica del Caracol” from Radio Euskadi.

We talked about our work, the “Inhabitants of the Microworld” series and our painting booklets.

If you want to listen to it (in Spanish), you can listen the whole program at their webpage or just the fragment in which we participate here:

We hope you find it interesting.

41. Nasty mess

The 41st chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Nasty mess”.

Larvae of the common fly (Musca domestica) are voracious feeders on any organic matter. The result of their activity is, generally, a decomposing mass, a mixture of the fluids of the decomposing matter and their own excrements. These larvae have not locomotive appendages, and they move on and inside the meal by mean of crawly movements. Their development is extraordinarily quick, and in a few days each larva will become an adult fly that will restart the cycle.

This is the 41st chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

40. Macro stars

The 40th chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Macro stars”.

There are already 40 videos from the series Inhabitants of the Microworld. To celebrate this, in this chapter we will show you some of the biggest protagonists we have been talking about. They are still small, sometimes VERY small, but they have a HUGE importance in our planet. THANK YOU FOR EXISTING! And THANK YOU FOR LETTING US EXIST!

This is the 40th chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

39. Hungry worm

The 39th chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Hungry worm”.

Naidids, also named detritus worms, conform a big group of microscopic annelids inhabiting both fresh and salty waters. Their food is composed by the particles of organic matter in the sediment. Some species, like that one appearing in the video, catch up the particles of food with their evaginable pharynx. This pharynx is evaginated through the mouth and has the shape of a strong balloon. In the video there have been inserted some small arrows indicating the location of that “tongue”. All these worms have a very important role in the recycling of the sediment, and are very common prey for other invertebrates and fish.

This is the 39th chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

38. Living comma

The 38th chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Living comma”.

Ceratopogonids, also known as “biting midges”, are close relatives to “non-biting midges” (Chironomids) and “black flies” (Simulidae). Adults of many species feed on blood and can be vectors of some diseases. Females lay eggs, with a characteristic shape of “comma”, adhered to the wet surfaces, and larvae spent all their developmental process as aquatic insects.

This is the 38th chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

Booklet Painting a freshwater pond

The new series of booklets is here. These next booklets will be about different ecosystems in which you can find microscopic organisms.

This week’s ecosystem will be the FRESHWATER POND.

The booklets still have 10 curiosities to learn from with their belonging photos and drawings to colour.

But, for this series of booklets, the artist Vanessa Linares has collaborated with us bringing her GUSPIRUS to the ecosystem with us.

Download this first booklet here to have fun with us and our new colleagues, the Guspirus.

Booklet Painting a freshwater pond
Poster Painting a freshwater pond