10. Ephemeral life

The tenth chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Ephemeral life”.

Mayflies, also called shadflies or fishflies, are insects of the order Ephemeroptera, one of the most ancient orders of insects known. Their name Ephemeroptera is due to the short life as adult. Adult of many species live only a few hours after the final moulting. In contrast with their short life as adult, their aquatic development can last a long time, even several years, and during this period, nymphs carry out several moults as they are growing. At the end of their nymphal development they emerge to the water surface, break the nymphal cuticle and became a subadult insect (called subimago). This subimago will later moult again to become into adult or imago. This is the only known example of an insect carrying out a moult in its winged phase.

This is the tenth chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

09. Lethal softness

The ninth chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Lethal softness”.

Hydra is a polyp, as anemones, although it does not live in the sea but in fresh water lakes and ponds. It has a delicate aspect and, usually, is not larger than a few millimetres. But its aparent delicacy is delusory. Hydra is a powerful predator of small aquatic animals that captures by mean of the urticant cells recovering the surface of its delicate tentacles.

This is the ninth chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

Booklet “Let’s paint microbes”

We have already published the second of the colouring booklets during this period of confinement: “Let’s paint microbes”.

We propose you to play at being microbiologists for a while, let’s take advantage of some of their “tricks” and learn a few things about microbes, those unknown microscopic organisms.

You will surely be surprised to see what beautiful colors they are able to create when they grow their colonies and that we do not need a microscope for that.

Don’t forget to send us some pictures of the final result of your favorite drawing or how you have had fun painting, as well as learning, with this booklet.

Send them to our social networks or to our e-mail: contact@scienceintoimages.com

Have fun!!

Booklet Let’s paint microbes

08. Down-up. Reflections

The eighth chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Down-up. Reflections”.


Water surface is a very especial place. It is here where the division between aquatic and aerial worlds are established. A lot of aquatic organisms come here to breathe from the air, as they do the larvae of many insects. An especial characteristic of the water surface is its surface tension. It is this factor that allows many little bugs to walk over the water.

This is the eighth chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

07. Born in a drop

The seventh chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Born in a drop”.

To hatch is the most important moment in the life of any organism, also the microscopic ones. In this chapter of the series we can see the very moment of the hatching of two animals, the chironomid non biting midge and the fresh water snail. A moment reached after a period of embryonic development inside the protective eggshell. From this moment the newborns start their lives in a world plenty of dangers, and only a few will reach the adult stage.

This is the seventh chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

06. Dancing flatworm

The sixth chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Dancing flatworm”.

Flatworms are a very interesting group of animals pertaining to the zoological phylum Platyhelminthes. These animals can live in both salty or fresh water, and even in the moisture of the woodlands. One of the main characteristics of flatworms is the ability to regenerate its body. They are capable to create again the lost or damaged parts of their body. This ability is directly related to its asexual reproductive strategy, gemmation or budding. This strategy is responsible for the creation of chains of individuals.

This is the sixth chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

Our accessible documentaries are available in the USA

We have some good news. DCMP (The Described and Captioned Media Program), has uploaded some of our documentaries to their website.

The DCMP is an idea that works thanks to funding from the U.S. Department of Education and administration from the National Association of the Deaf.

The mission of the U.S. Department of Education is to ensure equal access to education and promote educational excellence throughout the country. The U.S. Department of Education funds the DCMP through the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), which is part of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS).

As a measure to make home schooling easier in these days of confinement by COVID-19, they have opened access to many of the documentaries they have described and subtitled as a business.

In this way, many educators and parents of functionally diverse American students can use these documentaries for home schooling simply by registering as DCMP users.

“Termites. The Secret Queens of the Woodlands”, “Life from Light” and the “Hidden Biodiversity” series are now available, with audio description and captions, to many young people in the USA.

For those of you interested in these documentaries, you can watch the “Termites. The Secret Queens of the Woodlands” on our YouTube channel and “Life from Light” on Ruben Duro’s Vimeo channel.

If anyone is interested in the subtitled or audio version described in any of the documentaries, please send an email to: contact@scienceintoimages.com asking for them or with your questions.

05. Red midge

The fifth chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Red midge”.

Larvae of the non-biting flies of the family Chironomidae spend all their development into the water. They use to live near the bottom of ponds where the oxygen uses to be scarce. This is the reason because some of them have adopted haemoglobin (the same molecule we have in our blood) as a respiratory pigment. It is the presence of that pigment into their bodies that gives them their surprising red colour.

This is the fifth chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1lqCrjj_Czc&feature=youtu.be

04. Caddisflies

The fourth chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Caddisflies”.

Trichoptera, or caddisflies, are insects that spend all their embryonic development into the water. The eggs are protected by a gelatinous mass ensuring the ideal conditions for the development of the larvae. Few time after hatching, the larva of most species begin the construction of their own case. These cases not only protect the soft bodies of the larvae but also make them heavier, so also prevents them for being dragged by the stream.

This is the fourth chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.

03. Fan fighters

The third chapter of the “Inhabitants of the microworld” series is called “Fan fighters”.

Black fly larvae (Simulium sp.) offer an amazing aspect. Their maxillae are transformed in fan-like structures used to catch food particles and tiny organisms from the water which constitute their food. To select the place to stand up and display their fans is a very important task, so disputes and fights for the space are very common. When finishing the metamorphosis, these larvae become black flies that food on blood and can be a serious issue for the people in riverside villages.

This is the third chapter of a series that will bring to us a video per day during this confinement forced by COVID-19.

We hope that you enjoy this initiative, which gives access to a documentary series for free to the world, and you share it with everyone you think will possibly be interested.

Science into Images’s team.